Development of Integration Technologies for Superconducting Quantum Circuits

Menu

ABOUT

MOONSHOT

In this project, we aim to develop designing and manufacturing technologies of devices and equipment, which are necessary to realize the goal of the Moonshot program #6: realize a fault-tolerant universal quantum computer by 2050 that can solve problems which conventional computers cannot solve on a realistic timescale.

More specifically, in order to fully utilize a quantum bit (qubit) consisting of a superconducting circuit, we are going to establish technique of connecting qubit chips located at extremely low temperature and electronics equipment controlling them, improve quality of the qubit chip itself, and develop novel superconducting qubit chips which can be more easily handled.

What is a quantum computer?
In conventional computers, information is expressed as multiple bits, each of which stores 0 or 1 (classical bit). Then calculation is performed by logic gate operation on these classical bits. In quantum computers on the other hand, by using a so-called quantum superposition of 0 and 1 states (qubit), quantum logic gate operations on these qubits has effectively the same effect as if the parallel classical computation were performed simultaneously. So, the quantum computer can solve a kind of problems that conventional computers cannot solve on a realistic timescale. The quantum computer is considered to be suitable for dealing with complex and large-scale problems, such as actual natural and social phenomena.
Application of a quantum computer
For example, realizing phenomena occurred in nature or inside living organism by using heat or electricity requires a tremendous amount of energy. A quantum computer can be useful for understanding the mechanism of photosynthesis or developing innovative materials which can serve to reduce energy consumption, which eventually leads to realize an energy-saving sustainable society.
What is a superconducting qubit?
By lowering temperature of a specific metal or compound below a threshold called critical temperature, electrical resistance suddenly vanishes. This phenomenon is called superconductivity. A closed loop consisting of superconductor can maintain a current flow persistently thanks to its zero resistivity. By taking advantage of this phenomenon, a qubit chip can be made of a superconductor, where energy or information can be controlled by applying a magnetic/electric field.

MESSAGE

Recently, there have been world-wide intense research activities to develop superconducting quantum computer.

Towards the realization of practical fault-tolerant quantum computer beyond the NISQ machine, we still need lots of breakthroughs for the integration of the superconducting circuit.

The required technologies are related not only to the qubit device itself,but also to its peripherals such as control electronics, packaging, and refrigerator.

In this project, through the collaboration among groups with different expertises, those technologies are developed and optimized for the total system of future quantum computer.

Tsuyoshi Yamamoto

Project Manager

System Platform Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation
Research Fellow

ORGANIZATION

組織図

Development of Integration Technologies for Superconducting Quantum Circuits Project Management Office

1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 Japan
NEC-AIST Quantum Technology Cooperative Research Laboratory, AIST Tsukuba Central 2

MEMBER

Tsuyoshi Yamamoto
Improved superconducting qubit coherence

Tsuyoshi Yamamoto

System Platform Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation

Research Fellow

Kunihiro Inomata
Improved superconducting qubit coherence

Kunihiro Inomata

Research Center for Emerging Computing Technologies, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology

Senior Researcher

Kazuki Koshino
Improved superconducting qubit coherence

Kazuki Koshino

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Associate Professor

Fumiki Yoshihara
Developing qubit based on epitaxial junction

Fumiki Yoshihara

Advanced ICT Research Institute, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology

Senior Researcher

Masamitsu Tanaka
Developing qubit based on epitaxial junction

Masamitsu Tanaka

Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University

Assistant Professor

Satoru Odate
Developing qubit fabrication process with high throughput and uniformity

Satoru Odate

Optical Research Laboratory, Research & Development Division, Nikon Corporation

Technical Expert

Shiro Saito
Developing bosonic code using superconducting resonator

Shiro Saito

NTT Basic Research Laboratories

Distinguished Researcher

Atsushi Noguchi
Developing bosonic code using superconducting resonator

Atsushi Noguchi

RIKEN

Team Leader

Jaw Shen Tsai
Developing bosonic code using superconducting resonator

Jaw Shen Tsai

Tokyo University of Science, Department of Physics

Professor

Shinichi Yorozu
Design and manufacture of hybrid chips for qubits and peripheral electronics

Shinichi Yorozu

RIKEN Center for Quantum Computing

Deputy Director

Masamichi Saitoh
Development of refrigeration system specialized in quantum computing

Masamichi Saitoh

ULVAC CRYOGENICS INCORPORATED

Manager

Yuya Fujiwara
Development of refrigeration system specialized in quantum computing

Yuya Fujiwara

ULVAC, Inc. Components Division

Yoshinori Uzawa
Development of low noise microwave amplifier using superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer

Yoshinori Uzawa

Advanced Technology Center, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

Professor

Akira Kawakami
Development of low noise microwave amplifier using superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) mixer

Akira Kawakami

Advanced ICT Research Institute, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology

Senior Researcher

Masamitsu Tanaka
Study of single flux quantum circuits for control and readout of qubit

Masamitsu Tanaka

Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University

Assistant Professor

Munehiro Tada
Developing LSI working in low temperature for qubit control and readout

Munehiro Tada

NanoBridge Semiconductor, Inc.

Director and VP of Engineering

Ken Uchida
Developing LSI working in low temperature for qubit control and readout

Ken Uchida

Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo

Professor

Hiroki Ishikuro
Developing LSI working in low temperature for qubit control and readout

Hiroki Ishikuro

Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University

Professor

Makoto Negoro
Study of digital maicrowave electronics for controlling superconducting quantum computing

Makoto Negoro

QIQB center, OTRI, Osaka University

Specially appointed associate professor

Koji Inoue
Exploring quantum computer architecture

Koji Inoue

Kyushu university, Graduate School and Faculty of Information Science and Electrical Engineering / Quantum Computing System Center

Director / Professor

CONTACT

Please feel free to contact us with any questions and requests.
After confirming the content of your inquiry, the person in charge will contact you.